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The New York Times looks at the dismal testimony of an “accident reconstructionist”:

The “expert witness” in this case would not answer questions without his “formula sheets,” which were computer models used to reconstruct accidents. When asked to back up his work with basic calculations, he deflected, repeatedly derailing the proceedings.

Watch the video. It’s well worth your time and I promise you’ll see it in somebody’s professional development or conference session soon. It offers so much to so many.

And then help us all understand what went wrong here. What’s your theory? Does your theory explain this catastrophe? Does it recommend a course of action? If you could go back in time and drop down next to this expert as he was learning how to make and analyze scale drawings, how would you intervene?

My own answer starts off the comments.

BTW. Can anyone help us understand how the expert came to the incorrect answer of 68 feet?

BTW. Hot fire:

The motorcyclist’s lawyer filed a counter-motion to refuse payment to the expert witness. It contained the math standards for Wichita middle schools.

[via Christopher D. Long]

2016 Jan 2. The post hit the top of Hacker News overnight.

2016 Jan 2. One of the Hacker News commenters notes that the actual deposition video is available on YouTube.

Featured Comments:

gasstationwithoutpumps offers one explanation of the error:

3 3/8″ at a 240:1 scale gives 67.5′ which rounds to 68′

It is easy to mix up 3/8″ and 3/16″, which is one reason I prefer doing measurements in metric units.

katenerdypoo offers another:

It’s quite possible he accidentally keyed in 6/16, which when multiplied by 20 gives 7.5, therefore giving 68 feet. This is also a reasonable error, since the 6 is directly above the 3 on the calculator.

Jo illustrates a fourth grader’s process of solving the scale problem.

Robert Kaplinsky chalks this up to pride:

Lastly, it’s worth noting that eventually the heated conversation shifts from the actual math to whether or not he will do it or can do it. At that point it seems to become a pride issue.

Alex blames those awful office calculators:

The reconstructionist is given an office calculator, which doesn’t even have brackets. He needs to enter a counter-intuitive sequence of “3/16+3” to even get the starting point. When I was at school I remember being aware that most people wouldn’t be able to handle that kind of mental contortion. They’d never been asked to.
So what’s the problem, and how might we solve it? Well, the man’s been given the wrong tool for the job. He’s never been asked to use the wrong tool before & so this throws him. This makes him defensive and he latches onto an excuse about formula sheets.

Jeff Nielso:

The motorcyclist’s lawyer is the unrelenting classroom didactic whose motivation is based on making his student look and feel stupid. I was waiting for Act 2 where the lawyer would jump up, grab his felt marker, and demonstrate just how easy he can show the procedure.

Anna:

Interesting note: my grade 7 math class is in the middle of our unit on fractions, decimals, and percents, so I showed them this video so we could work on the problem. I thought they’d get a chuckle out of it and feel good about solving a problem that the expert on TV couldn’t solve.

Their reaction was unanimous. They identified with the guy and wanted them to give him his formula sheets. Some of them were pretty riled up about it!

They’re quite accustomed to me showing them videos and doing activities that are designed to build up their understanding that everyone approaches things differently, and we’ll all get there even if we take different paths. This guy wasn’t allowed to follow his path and do it his own way, and they were unfairly putting him on the spot and forcing him to do it their way.

It’s a rich problem, so I’ll use it again, but I think I’ll set it up and frame it a little differently next time!

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Malcolm Swan:

When we’ve done analyses of the results of [our professional development efforts], we’ve found that teachers often move from a transmission approach where they tell the class everything and the students have been fairly passive, they’ve usually moved in two directions.

One is retrograde. They’ve moved towards individual discovery. They say “I’ve been saying everything to these students for so long. What I’ll do now is withdraw and let them play with the ideas. I’ve been saying too much. I’ll withdraw and let them discover stuff.” That’s worse than the place where they started.

The other place is where they move in and they challenge students and work with them on their knowledge together. That’s a better place. That’ smore effective.

And so in professional development, people take a path. Over time they might move from transmission to discovery to collaborative connectionist. So they might actually get worse before they get better.

That’s one of the problems with evaluating whether its been successful by looking at student outcomes. People take awhile to learn new things.

Earlier in the talk, he describes counterproductive designs for professional development:

Most of the time [in teacher professional development] we inform people of something and then we say “go and do it.” That’s not the way people learn. Usually they learn by doing something and then reflecting upon it.

So when you start with a professional development, you say, “Try this out in your classroom. It doesn’t matter if it doesn’t work. Then observe your students and then as a result you might change your beliefs and attitudes.”

You don’t set out by changing beliefs and attitudes. People only change themselves as they reflect on their own experiences.

And then productive ones:

If you’re designing a course, we usually start by recognizing and valuing the context the teacher is working in and trying to get them to explain and explore their existing values, beliefs, and practices.

Then we will provide them with something vividly challenging. It might be through video or it might be through reading something. And this is really different to what they currently do.

And through this challenge we ask them to suspend their belief and try and act in new ways as if they believed differently.

And as they do this we offer support and mentoring as they go back into the classroom to try something out.

And then they come back together again and it’s taken over then by the teachers who reflect on the experiences they’ve had, the implications that come out of their experiences, and recognize and talk about where they’ve changed in their understandings, beliefs, and practices.

What’s great about Malcolm Swan and the Shell Centre is their designs for teacher learning line up exactly with their designs for student learning. It all coheres.

Marbleslides Is Here

Marbleslides is the latest activity from my team at Desmos. It’s simple. We set up some stars. You press a “launch” button and marbles drop.

But here you have collected zero stars. No success.

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That’s because your students need to set up parabolic, linear, exponential, sinusoidal, or rational functions to send the marbles on a trip through those stars.

Success!

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That’s Marbleslides and you and your students should play it this week and let us all know how it goes. If you want a preview, head to student.desmos.com LINK and type “eht8”.

If you want to set up your own class, head to the Marbleslides activities listing, choose a function family, and get a classcode of your own.

Here are some quick, below-the-fold notes about what we’re trying to do here and why we’re trying to do it.

Delight. Whenever possible we want students to experience the same sense of delight about math that all of us at Desmos feel. Students can experience that delight both in pure and applied contexts and Marbleslides is that latter experience. Seriously, try not to grin.

Purposeful Practice. Picture two students, both graphing dozens of rational functions. One finds the experience dreary and the other finds it purposeful. The difference is the wrapper around that graphing task. If the wrapper is no more purposeful than a worksheet of graphing tasks, your student may fatigue after the first few graphs. In our Marbleslides classroom tests, we watched students transform the same function dozens of times – stretching it, shrinking it, nudging it up, down, left, and right by tiny amounts. That’s the Marbleslides wrapper. Students have a goal. Their pursuit of that goal will put you in a position to have some interesting conversations about these functions and their transformations.

BTW. Here’s the announcement post on the Desblog.

Great Classroom Action

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Scott Keltner sent a drone up in the sky while his students plotted themselves down below. I emailed Scott and asked for his lesson plan and he sent back something involving playing cards and, frankly, none of it made any sense to me and I seriously don’t understand how the downside of cost, time, and effort could possibly outweigh the upside of drones (!) but I’m so curious. Bug Scott via Twitter to write up what he did here.

Julie Reulbach used zombies to create a need for logarithms. Zombies are, obviously, catnip for some students, but that isn’t what caught my eye here. Julie understood that logarithms are a shortcut for inverting an exponential equation. And if you’d like to create a need for a shortcut it’s helpful for students to experience the longcut, however briefly. Watch her work.

Ollie Lovell used one of my unposted tasks with a group of students in Myanmar who spoke very limited English and whose classroom had no electricity. Imagine how your favorite lessons would have to change under those constraints and then read how Ollie changed his. I learned a lot.

Sarah Hagan shares a game from S T called Greed, which helped turn her students’ perception of box-and-whisker plots from useless to useful. Crucially, the game exploits the need for box-and-whisker plots, which is comparison between multiple sets. Creating a box-and-whisker plot for a single set of data will feel pointless, same as teaching someone to use a carrot peeler by using it to paint a house. That’s not what it’s for!

NCTM Gets It

Here are two reasons to be encouraged about the work and vision of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, followed by my hope for its future.

NCTM is obviously interested in recruiting new members, along with all of their new ideas.

Two years ago there was a panel discussion dedicated to technology in math education which featured a bunch of math Twitter-types. The following year saw an entire strand dedicated to ideas from those math Twitter-types. Then the math Twitter-types occupied the opening keynote at this year’s Nashville regional conference, immediately after which Robert Kaplinsky took my favorite photo from that conference.

Mark it, friends, or correct me if I’m wrong: that’s the first appearance of a current NCTM President at what the Twitter-types call a “tweetup.”

Just five years ago, these Twitter-types occupied the fringe. It’s so nice to see everybody making friends and learning from one another. This only bodes well.

NCTM’s new conference website has promise.

The history: Zak Champagne, Mike Flynn, and I ran Shadow Con as an experiment in extending the face-to-face conference experience. We offered speakers a more powerful platform on the web for interacting with attendees (live and virtual) than NCTM’s existing read-only conference program website.

We reported the results of that experiment to NCTM’s executive team and that was the last any of us heard from them until this year’s regional conferences when they tweeted out their new conference website. Look at it!

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The featured speakers at the regional conferences each get their own page on a WordPress installation. On first glance those pages look just like a conference website. Title, description, and time. Just the facts. But speakers can add files, videos, and other resources. Then there is a comment box where attendees can get in touch before and after the session.

A colleague of mine remarked: “It’s a mixed bag.” Yeah, but what a mix!

Out of the 28 featured sessions across the three regional conferences, seven presenters don’t seem to have visited their page. That lack of attention has basically zero downside. Their pages look just like they would on any read-only conference program website. Title, description, and time. Just the facts.

And across the other 21 sessions, there is a pile of activity!

All of this is possible without NCTM site’s but none of it is easy to do and none of it is easy to find.

So here is my hope for the future of NCTM conferences.

Extend this website to cover all presenters from all NCTM conferences and offer it to affiliate organizations for their conferences as well.

I want to click Annie Fetter’s name on one page and see all the talks she’s ever given, across geography and time, including five years ago at some random state affiliate conference I never knew existed.

I want to search for “Kate Nowak NCTM” in Google and find her past conference pages and also her upcoming talks.

Before I attend a conference, I want to locate presenters whose talks seem to provoke a lot of online discussion afterwards, and then attend those.

If NCTM makes this commitment, they’ll increase their value to current and prospective members several times over.

For current members, they increase the value of conference attendance and decrease the pressure on attendees to attend every session. (Expect the question “Will you be posting your resources to your page?” to float around Twitter in the weeks leading up to every conference.) The conference page will connect attendees and speakers in the twelve months between annual conferences.

Prospective members, the kind who wonder “Why NCTM?”, may start to land on conference pages more often than Pinterest boards when they search for resources. As those prospective members explore the resources on those conference pages, NCTM can recommend journals, articles, books, tasks, and other conference pages that may also be helpful. NCTM can point those visitors to upcoming conferences and sessions on those themes, converting non-members into members and members into stronger teachers.

Until future notice, I am a single-issue voter in all NCTM elections and this is my issue.

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