Great Classroom Action

Classrooms are back in session in the United States, which means lots of classroom action, lots of it great.

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The blogger at Simplify With Me posts two interesting activities with dice, one involving blank dice, and the other involving space battles:

Once you have your ships, place one die on the engine, one on the shield, and the other two on each weapon. Which die on which part you ask. That’s the magic of this activity. Each person gets to decide for themselves.

Kathryn Belmonte posts five more uses for dice in her math classroom.

Kate Nowak set the tone for her school year with debate about a set of shapes:

Then I said, okay, so here’s a little secret: what we think of as mathematics is just the result of what everyone has agreed on. We could take our definition of “the same” and run with it. In geometry there’s a special word “congruent” where specific things, that everyone agrees to like a secret pact, are okay and not okay. Then, I erased “the same” and replaced it with “congruent,” and made any adjustments to the definition to make it correct. They had heard the word congruent before, and had the perfectly reasonable middle school understanding that congruent means “same size and shape.” I said that that was great in middle school, but in high school geometry we’re going to be more precise and formal in our language.

Hannah Schuchhardt isn’t happy with how her game of Transformation Telephone worked but I thought the premise was great:

I love this activity because it gives kids a way to practice together as a group and self-assess as they go through. Kids are competitive and want their transformations to work out in the end!

Featured Comments

Mary Dooms:

Kate does a great job connecting all the dots by focusing on the learning target at the end of the lesson. It appears all great classroom action positions the learning target there. Now to convince our administrators.

About 
I'm Dan and this is my blog. I'm a former high school math teacher and current head of teaching at Desmos. More here.

6 Comments

  1. Kate does a great job connecting all the dots by focusing on the learning target at the end of the lesson. It appears all great classroom action positions the learning target there. Now to convince our administrators.

  2. I really like the create your own dice activity. Since I’m teaching integers this year I think I’ll try it with negative values allowed on the sides. Also maybe use the dice to get around on a gamified number line.

  3. Teaching integers or reviewing integers is something I tend to have to do each year, or usually slot it into our learning throughout the beginning of the semester. This dice activity looks like it would work well for my students as well. How were you planning to integrate this idea @George ?