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Never heard of a Graphing Story? Here’s one I made earlier this week:

Height v. Time from Dan Meyer on Vimeo.

What’s fun is meeting people who tell me they’re still using Graphing Stories, which is a lesson that in Internet years is basically old enough to cash Social Security checks. What’s awful is that people are still using the same set of ten videos, one of which is so ridiculous I can link to it but I can’t bear to watch it ever again.

The fact of the matter is that teachers and students have great ideas for their own graphing stories. The other fact is that the tools for creating them are just out of reach of many of those same people. Tools shouldn’t impede creativity, so here’s the plan:

You handle the creativity. I’ll deal with the tools.

I’ve partnered up with the good folks at BuzzMath to create a very simple workflow for you.

What You’ll Need

  1. Fifteen seconds of video of something happening.
  2. A graph that describes what’s happening. (Use this template.)

What You’ll Do

  1. Point your browser to www.graphingstories.com.
  2. Upload your fifteen-second story.
  3. Upload your graph. (Take a photo of it. Scan it. Whatever)
  4. Wait for an e-mail with a download link.

I’ll be creating all the graphing stories manually, on a first-come-first-served basis, one story per person. After ten days, I’ll cut off submissions and get down to work.

The result? A massive collection of graphing stories spanning all kinds of interesting dimensions (height, speed, distance, pain, happiness, etc) that we can all download and use in our classrooms.

So get to work. Tell your students. Tell a friend. Reblog and retweet this thing. Let’s make it huge.

22 Responses to “For The Next Ten Days Only: Create Your Own Graphing Story At GraphingStories.com”

  1. on 18 May 2011 at 8:42 amJoshua Schmidt

    While I am a HUGE fan of this idea, I have a few questions. Number 1 – is there limitations of how many submissions a singular person should send?

    Number 2 – I feel like the workload associated with this project could potentially be massive. I feel like this is a lot for one person, are you ready for it?

    Number 3 – Are you going to make all of these available when you are done? Like a collaboration of sorts for these graphing stories?

    Thanks, Dan!

  2. on 18 May 2011 at 10:16 amBowen Kerins

    Good luck, it’s a great idea. No matter what happens, you at least got a cartoon version of yourself put on the Web.

    (Are submissions from video games allowed? If I were teaching this year, I would be using Portal 2 examples repeatedly for this sort of thing.)

  3. on 18 May 2011 at 10:55 amAndrei

    I wonder if some clever programmer could make something that handles this automatically?

    The idea being that you could put a video and a picture (of the right format) in a folder, add a text file with the story’s title and the graph’s axes, double-click an exe, and it would then assemble the finished product just as shown above?

  4. on 18 May 2011 at 10:59 amChristopher Danielson

    Joshua:

    Number 1 – is there limitations of how many submissions a singular person should send?

    Dan:

    I’ll be creating all the graphing stories manually, on a first-come-first-served basis, one story per person.

    Joshua:

    Are you going to make all of these available when you are done? Like a collaboration of sorts for these graphing stories?

    Dan:

    The result? A massive collection of graphing stories spanning all kinds of interesting dimensions (height, speed, distance, pain, happiness, etc) that we can all download and use in our classrooms.

    Yes. Our boy will be busy. Perhaps time to buy stock in Bay Area coffeeshops?

  5. [...] http://blog.mrmeyer.com/?p=10213 [...]

  6. on 18 May 2011 at 3:43 pmAlex Otto

    Hi Dan. Thanks for a good dialogue on Christopher’s site. I checked out your blog and I like this idea. I wish my classes still met so I could offer this challenge to the kids! (We finish school here in Alaska ridiculously early – I’m not talking about college, but middle school.) Any restrictions in terms of topic, etc.? (I was thinking about what Bowen had asked about – video games)

    Alex Otto

  7. on 18 May 2011 at 7:31 pmJill Backlund

    I’m very excited for this project. I LOVE the Portal idea. I use your “ancient” videos with my precalc classes. I think it’s so valuable to be able to see functions of time when heading into a calculus class. It’ll be so much easier to talk to them about derivatives with these experiences under their belts! Although I probably won’t film my own, I’m excited to have a larger bank to choose from!!

  8. on 18 May 2011 at 7:33 pmJill Backlund

    One thing I hope to see, as I am using these with more advanced students, is that there are no instant, sharp turns on the graphs. All of the old videos probably should have been differentiable at every point.

  9. on 19 May 2011 at 4:42 amDeb

    I love the collaboration here and want to be involved, but I’m teaching chemistry at the moment rather than maths. My students have very low literacy and speak English as a second language so it’s perfect for them.
    With 10 days, I’m sure I’ll think of a way to fit it in.

  10. on 19 May 2011 at 9:51 amAlex Otto

    I tried to film my daughter eating cheerios but she only managed to eat about 1 cheerio in 15 seconds and it ends with my other daughter yelling, “You’re a cheerio face!” I’m going to try to film her walking or giggling or something. So you will hopefully have at least one baby video. :)

  11. on 19 May 2011 at 3:39 pmJulie Reulbach

    Yes! I used your old graphing stories and then had my 7th graders make their own. We used YouTube and google presentation software. I will send you the links to their presentations. I don’t know if we’ll have time to redo in your desired format within the ten day parameter. They are currently working intensively on large cross-curricular project. Thanks for inspiring us as always!

  12. on 19 May 2011 at 6:15 pmNicole

    My students are very excited! I’m very appreciative that you are willing to do this! Thanks for inspiring…

  13. on 19 May 2011 at 7:47 pmJulie Reulbach

    Here is one of the Graphing Stories my students made. Their graph needs work. : )

    https://docs.google.com/present/edit?id=0AfD0Ypv1wa7ZZGR6eGgya21fMHF0NjZxM2Rz&hl=en_US

  14. on 20 May 2011 at 6:13 amDaniel Peters

    You don’t need to be a clairvoyant to tell that this is indeed going to be huge.

    But please, Dan, tell us the following:
    - How many stories do you expect to be uploaded?
    - How many graphing stories will you be able to process in a finite amount of time?

  15. on 20 May 2011 at 6:29 amDan Meyer

    @Daniel, I’ll put the over/under on this thing at 100 videos. Do you want the over or the under?

    The limiting factor here is less my time than my computer’s processing speed. I’ve written up a script — very proud of myself here — that automates most of the process. Rendering is still rendering, though.

  16. on 20 May 2011 at 8:38 amChristian

    Great service. Letting students do this with simulation s/w perhaps even more worthwhile. My school uses http://cma-science.nl/english/software/coach6/coach6.html

  17. on 20 May 2011 at 7:25 pmGraphing Stories « I Speak Math

    [...] links to their movies below. Now, seven months later Dan has created a Graphing Stories website and very generously offered to create beautiful Graphing Stories videos from stories we all send in!  I am excited about this extension of their graphing stories for my students.  This is perfect [...]

  18. on 20 May 2011 at 7:35 pmJulie Reulbach

    Hey Dan,

    To introduce your project, we watched the Graphing Stories that my 7th graders made again today. They are here http://ispeakmath.wordpress.com/2011/05/21/graphing-stories/

    I was reminded that in your original graphing stories you included a blank graph with labeled axes so that students could get their graphs all ready before the video started. I noticed that you did not have this blank “preview” graph on your swing video. Are you going to include the blank graph with the new videos?

    Sorry for so many comments! : )

    Thanks!
    Julie

  19. on 21 May 2011 at 10:06 amDan Meyer

    Super fun, Julie. Thanks for sharing your students’ work.

  20. on 30 Jan 2012 at 5:21 pmMike Campbell

    Are these posted up some where? I would love to see them!

  21. on 30 Jan 2012 at 5:38 pmJulie Reulbach

    Yes. Me too. My students received the links to their videos over the summer, but only a few forwarded them to me. Now they can’t find them. Middle schoolers. :)

  22. on 30 Jan 2012 at 5:48 pmDan Meyer

    Yeah … slow going there. It’s on the to-do list, though.