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8 Responses to “The Hardest Part About Teaching”

  1. on 25 Apr 2007 at 5:40 pmChris Lehmann

    Dare we take that to the level of metaphor?

  2. on 25 Apr 2007 at 5:57 pmdan

    I’m trying to imagine what that could mean but metaphor’s a litttttle outside the math teacher’s job description.

  3. on 25 Apr 2007 at 8:09 pmSteve

    I think it’s a succinct way of expressing the difficulty to translating to another point of view. Looks like someone’s been practicing their design skills. You’re lookin sharp, pal.

  4. on 25 Apr 2007 at 8:52 pmH.

    “I’m trying to imagine what that could mean but metaphor’s a litttttle outside the math teacher’s job description.”

    Maybe so. But consider the literal meanings of, for example,
    “completing the square”
    graphing an equation”
    “raising to a power”
    height of a triangle”
    “multiplying”
    “integrating”

    Such an interest in metaphorical origins of math expressions might just be another expression of math people’s stereotypical affinity for bad puns, though…

  5. on 25 Apr 2007 at 9:36 pmdan

    Ah, there it is. Thanks, fellas. Steve, you missed your calling. H., we oughtta set up a pun wiki and just get ‘em out there.

  6. on 30 Apr 2007 at 10:34 pmSmurf

    I would have pointed the other way … just to confuse them :o)

  7. on 02 May 2007 at 2:27 pmMs. Cornelius

    I know exactly what you mean! But look at it this way– if you ever go to England, you have practice in negotiating the roadways in a car. Just think of a right turn as a left turn (Pause and look before turning across traffic) and a left turn as a right turn (pause and turn around a corner).

    Worked like a charm.

  8. […] A few weeks ago I posted this diptych, the only intent of which was to illustrate my gripping inability to see left and right from my students’ perspective. […]