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Back On My Grind

Thanks for all the commisseration on my recent crisis post. That was helpful.

After last week’s pummeling I came in today with fists figuratively flying. I took some time this weekend to reconnect with what I love most about this linear unit which has been hitting me so hard. Namely, I dig that you can draw a mathematical picture of any situation in life and that sometimes — oftentimes — that picture can predict beyond the picture itself.

Armed with that enthusiasm, my usual workaholicism, and a righteous indignation over my lousiness last week, I banged out — no joke — the single greatest lesson of my career. By a long shot. The silver medalist is gasping for air a few miles down the road.

I beg your pardon but words and modesty both fail me right now. I wish I knew a better way to pull off lessons like these than through copious man-hours (18 over this weekend for a 45-minute lesson) but, at this point, that’s my only tried-and-true technique for not sucking at this job.

So encompassing was the idea and so onerous its demands I have no doubt its execution would’ve taken me a commited week last year at this time if it didn’t break me first. This math lesson was a planning marathon run at a sprinter’s pace. It sucked graphic design, video production, and creative writing into its orbit, which was about as exhilarating for me as you can imagine.

Naturally I want to show it off, inviting suggestions for improvement and accusations of overhype. I need a week to tweak some things (can’t bring anything less than the best to the blogosphere), format the supplementals correctly, and (teaser!) figure out how to properly seed a torrent file. ‘Til then, hope teaching’s been treating you as well.

3 Responses to “Back On My Grind”

  1. on 24 Apr 2007 at 3:04 amTony Lucchese

    Why am I envisioning you in some sort of lesson planning training montage?

  2. on 24 Apr 2007 at 6:27 amdan

    Weird you mention it since it occured me (during the weekend) that I was adopting Sylvester Stallone’s grief process from Cliffhanger. He chose the monastic order while I opted for a purging lesson-planning marathon. Life imitating cheesy 90’s art.

  3. […] All that said, one point of yours demands some clarification. … you seem to believe that the only way to succeed in a classroom is to spend a pretty ridiculous amount of time preparing each lesson. […]